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  • See how Jerry Brown measured California's bleak snowpack in 2015

    On April 1, 2015, Gov. Jerry Brown attended a routine snow survey at 6,800 feet in the Sierra Nevada, near Echo Summit on Highway 50 along the road to Lake Tahoe. The April survey is an annual ritual, marking the end of the winter season, in which automated sensors and technicians in the field strive to measure how much water the state’s farms and cities will receive from snowmelt. The measurements, explained by Frank Gehrke, chief of the California cooperative snow surveys program, showed the snowpack at just 5 percent of average for April 1, 2015, well below the previous record low of 25 percent, which was reached in 2014, and in 1977.

On April 1, 2015, Gov. Jerry Brown attended a routine snow survey at 6,800 feet in the Sierra Nevada, near Echo Summit on Highway 50 along the road to Lake Tahoe. The April survey is an annual ritual, marking the end of the winter season, in which automated sensors and technicians in the field strive to measure how much water the state’s farms and cities will receive from snowmelt. The measurements, explained by Frank Gehrke, chief of the California cooperative snow surveys program, showed the snowpack at just 5 percent of average for April 1, 2015, well below the previous record low of 25 percent, which was reached in 2014, and in 1977. David Siders The Sacramento Bee
On April 1, 2015, Gov. Jerry Brown attended a routine snow survey at 6,800 feet in the Sierra Nevada, near Echo Summit on Highway 50 along the road to Lake Tahoe. The April survey is an annual ritual, marking the end of the winter season, in which automated sensors and technicians in the field strive to measure how much water the state’s farms and cities will receive from snowmelt. The measurements, explained by Frank Gehrke, chief of the California cooperative snow surveys program, showed the snowpack at just 5 percent of average for April 1, 2015, well below the previous record low of 25 percent, which was reached in 2014, and in 1977. David Siders The Sacramento Bee

Melting snow, water releases and La Niña complicate California’s drought picture

June 20, 2016 2:04 PM

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