Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., shown here in 2015, has been criticized by conservatives and Catholic leaders for questioning conservative federal court nominee Amy Coney Barrett on Catholic dogma and whether it would influence her rulings. Barrett, a Notre Dame law professor tapped to serve on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, has written that Catholics must follow their religion on court decisions involving moral issues, such as abortion and the death penalty. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., shown here in 2015, has been criticized by conservatives and Catholic leaders for questioning conservative federal court nominee Amy Coney Barrett on Catholic dogma and whether it would influence her rulings. Barrett, a Notre Dame law professor tapped to serve on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, has written that Catholics must follow their religion on court decisions involving moral issues, such as abortion and the death penalty. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File) Cliff Owen AP
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., shown here in 2015, has been criticized by conservatives and Catholic leaders for questioning conservative federal court nominee Amy Coney Barrett on Catholic dogma and whether it would influence her rulings. Barrett, a Notre Dame law professor tapped to serve on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, has written that Catholics must follow their religion on court decisions involving moral issues, such as abortion and the death penalty. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File) Cliff Owen AP

Feinstein had to ask Trump’s judicial nominee about religion. Stop attacking her for it.

September 19, 2017 05:25 AM

UPDATED September 20, 2017 07:24 PM

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