Local

We’ll welcome more than a dozen summer interns, which is a win for them, us and you

The Sacramento Bee’s 2019 intern class includes (clockwise from top left) Arden Barnes, Meghan Bobrowsky, Panchalay Chalermkraivuth, Jaimie Ding, Candice Wang, Elliot Wailoo, Kyung Mi Lee and David Garza.
The Sacramento Bee’s 2019 intern class includes (clockwise from top left) Arden Barnes, Meghan Bobrowsky, Panchalay Chalermkraivuth, Jaimie Ding, Candice Wang, Elliot Wailoo, Kyung Mi Lee and David Garza.

As a regular reader of The Sacramento Bee, you may have noticed a few new bylines these days.

That’s because the 2019 class of Bee interns has started to arrive.

A dozen or so students will join our newsroom and your community for the summer. They come from Sacramento State, Yale and Northwestern University, among others.

Journalists have gotten really good at covering local journalism’s challenges. And yes, we have plenty.

Case in point: A recent Pew report found that while 70 percent of readers thought their local news organization was doing well, only 14 percent of them paid for their local news. When coupled with the fact that Google and Facebook have gobbled up about 90 percent of digital advertising, you can see why this is troubling.

A sustainable future for local news must be forged with the input and engagement of both our communities and the next generation of journalists.

As we look to report on issues and stories important to you, I hope you’ve discovered our year-long community listening project called Beyond Sacramento. In it we ask you to help us decide what stories we should explore in the region.

We’ve also recently launched a new tips page, which offers a step-by-step guide on how to share stories with The Bee anonymously and with specific reporters.

We are in better service of all when you choose to engage with us. Please keep suggestions coming. We are listening.

Speaking of, we are eager to listen to and learn from our 2019 interns. They will help us better understand how to reach and deliver timely, fair and independent news across platforms and formats.

And we similarly are invested in them. Each summer our interns receive training in how to make videos and how to write a breaking news story. They get mentorship in media ethics and libel, in safe practices for wildfire coverage and how to file open records requests. They will meet with Pulitzer Prize winners on our team – photographer Renée C. Byer and cartoonist Jack Ohman. And they are paid for their work.

Please join me in welcoming our diverse class of 2019: Mila Jasper, Arden Barnes, Kyung Mi Lee, Elliot Wailoo, Candice Wang, Panchalay Chalermkraivuth, Meghan Bobrowsky, Jaimie Ding, Caroline Ghisolfi, Elaine Chen, David Garza, Elizabeth Shwe and Vincent Moleski.

Combined, they will share hundreds of videos, photos and stories with you.

“A lot of reporters at the national level are doing important work and a lot of people read it.” said Bobrowsky, an incoming junior at Scripps College who is from Davis and who will work with our breaking news team this summer. “But local reporting often gets overlooked, and it’s very important to keep local officials accountable. Local newsrooms are doing all the work people are doing on the national level, but with fewer resources.”

Please support local reporting by purchasing a digital subscription to The Bee or by picking one up for a friend. For just $6 a month to start you’ll get access to all of our newsletters, video, breaking news updates, daily podcast, early event invitations and more. Visit this link to sign up or to share the offer with others.

  Comments