Shelly Hoover, right, watches her granddaughter Brynnlee Thomas, 4, dance at her home in Lincoln on April 6. Hoover is an ALS patient who plans to request an experimental drug as soon as it becomes available this summer. New California legislation, effective Jan. 1, gives patients with terminal illnesses access to drugs that haven’t been fully approved by the FDA.
Shelly Hoover, right, watches her granddaughter Brynnlee Thomas, 4, dance at her home in Lincoln on April 6. Hoover is an ALS patient who plans to request an experimental drug as soon as it becomes available this summer. New California legislation, effective Jan. 1, gives patients with terminal illnesses access to drugs that haven’t been fully approved by the FDA. Randall Benton rbenton@sacbee.com
Shelly Hoover, right, watches her granddaughter Brynnlee Thomas, 4, dance at her home in Lincoln on April 6. Hoover is an ALS patient who plans to request an experimental drug as soon as it becomes available this summer. New California legislation, effective Jan. 1, gives patients with terminal illnesses access to drugs that haven’t been fully approved by the FDA. Randall Benton rbenton@sacbee.com

Can California’s ‘right to try’ law help save terminal patients?

April 15, 2017 04:00 AM