More Videos

'One Pill Can Kill': Raising prescription drug awareness 2:51

'One Pill Can Kill': Raising prescription drug awareness

See National Zoo's panda take a roll in the snow 0:35

See National Zoo's panda take a roll in the snow

Watch helicopters draw water from reservoir to drop on Thomas Fire 0:56

Watch helicopters draw water from reservoir to drop on Thomas Fire

Fanatic! Sacramento Republic FC fans rally outside MLS headquarters in New York 0:39

Fanatic! Sacramento Republic FC fans rally outside MLS headquarters in New York

49ers: Three players with most on the line as season nears its end 1:32

49ers: Three players with most on the line as season nears its end

Mother of slain football star thinks Sacramento program could have saved her son 0:49

Mother of slain football star thinks Sacramento program could have saved her son

Take a look at the planned housing project at the railyard 1:03

Take a look at the planned housing project at the railyard

See how much California's gas tax will rise through 2020 2:11

See how much California's gas tax will rise through 2020

Jerry Brown says gas tax vote was above board 0:27

Jerry Brown says gas tax vote was above board

Alex Padilla on sexual harassment allegations at the Capitol 0:33

Alex Padilla on sexual harassment allegations at the Capitol

  • Rafters go wild despite alcohol ban

    Sacramento area residents flocked to the American River for the annual Rafting Gone Wild outing despite an alcohol ban during the event that's been in effect for a few years now. Some estimates put the number of people hitting the waterway at over 8,000.

Sacramento area residents flocked to the American River for the annual Rafting Gone Wild outing despite an alcohol ban during the event that's been in effect for a few years now. Some estimates put the number of people hitting the waterway at over 8,000. Autumn Payne The Sacramento Bee
Sacramento area residents flocked to the American River for the annual Rafting Gone Wild outing despite an alcohol ban during the event that's been in effect for a few years now. Some estimates put the number of people hitting the waterway at over 8,000. Autumn Payne The Sacramento Bee

Nonpermitted ‘Raftopia’ prompts alcohol ban on American River

August 18, 2016 11:32 AM

UPDATED August 18, 2016 04:15 PM

Comments

More Videos

'One Pill Can Kill': Raising prescription drug awareness 2:51

'One Pill Can Kill': Raising prescription drug awareness

See National Zoo's panda take a roll in the snow 0:35

See National Zoo's panda take a roll in the snow

Watch helicopters draw water from reservoir to drop on Thomas Fire 0:56

Watch helicopters draw water from reservoir to drop on Thomas Fire

Fanatic! Sacramento Republic FC fans rally outside MLS headquarters in New York 0:39

Fanatic! Sacramento Republic FC fans rally outside MLS headquarters in New York

49ers: Three players with most on the line as season nears its end 1:32

49ers: Three players with most on the line as season nears its end

Mother of slain football star thinks Sacramento program could have saved her son 0:49

Mother of slain football star thinks Sacramento program could have saved her son

Take a look at the planned housing project at the railyard 1:03

Take a look at the planned housing project at the railyard

See how much California's gas tax will rise through 2020 2:11

See how much California's gas tax will rise through 2020

Jerry Brown says gas tax vote was above board 0:27

Jerry Brown says gas tax vote was above board

Alex Padilla on sexual harassment allegations at the Capitol 0:33

Alex Padilla on sexual harassment allegations at the Capitol

  • These salmon swim upstream -- to dinner tables

    At the end of their lifecycle, many salmon that reach the Nimbus Fish Hatchery are killed for spawning, then their carcasses are frozen and shipped for processing. The salmon will be distributed to food banks to help needy families during the winter months.