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Take a trip down memory lane for SMF’s 50th anniversary 1:33

Take a trip down memory lane for SMF’s 50th anniversary

Solano County Fairgrounds shelters livestock evacuated from fires 2:21

Solano County Fairgrounds shelters livestock evacuated from fires

'What are we going to do with people who no longer have a home?' 1:19

'What are we going to do with people who no longer have a home?'

Tubbs Fire aftermath, as seen from above 1:30

Tubbs Fire aftermath, as seen from above

Watch Placer County Sheriff arrest two Truckee men suspected of statutory rape 0:23

Watch Placer County Sheriff arrest two Truckee men suspected of statutory rape

Raiders QB Derek Carr discusses victory vs. Chiefs 1:48

Raiders QB Derek Carr discusses victory vs. Chiefs

Banned books that shaped American literature 2:08

Banned books that shaped American literature

Former Kings star DeMarcus Cousins lists Granite Bay mansion for $5,399,000 1:54

Former Kings star DeMarcus Cousins lists Granite Bay mansion for $5,399,000

See Oroville dam spillway shaping up as repairs continue and deadline looms 2:18

See Oroville dam spillway shaping up as repairs continue and deadline looms

Coming right down the chute at Oroville Dam spillway 1:40

Coming right down the chute at Oroville Dam spillway

  • San Joaquin Valley farmers keep drilling, even as groundwater limits loom

    Two years after California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill designed to limit groundwater pumping, new wells are going in faster and deeper than ever in the San Joaquin Valley farm belt. Farmers say they have no choice given cuts in surface water deliveries. But the drilling has exacted a substantial human cost in some of California’s poorest rural communities.

Two years after California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill designed to limit groundwater pumping, new wells are going in faster and deeper than ever in the San Joaquin Valley farm belt. Farmers say they have no choice given cuts in surface water deliveries. But the drilling has exacted a substantial human cost in some of California’s poorest rural communities. Ryan Sabalow The Sacramento Bee
Two years after California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill designed to limit groundwater pumping, new wells are going in faster and deeper than ever in the San Joaquin Valley farm belt. Farmers say they have no choice given cuts in surface water deliveries. But the drilling has exacted a substantial human cost in some of California’s poorest rural communities. Ryan Sabalow The Sacramento Bee

What does the new federal water bill mean for California? For one, a big win for farmers

December 12, 2016 5:48 PM

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More Videos

Take a trip down memory lane for SMF’s 50th anniversary 1:33

Take a trip down memory lane for SMF’s 50th anniversary

Solano County Fairgrounds shelters livestock evacuated from fires 2:21

Solano County Fairgrounds shelters livestock evacuated from fires

'What are we going to do with people who no longer have a home?' 1:19

'What are we going to do with people who no longer have a home?'

Tubbs Fire aftermath, as seen from above 1:30

Tubbs Fire aftermath, as seen from above

Watch Placer County Sheriff arrest two Truckee men suspected of statutory rape 0:23

Watch Placer County Sheriff arrest two Truckee men suspected of statutory rape

Raiders QB Derek Carr discusses victory vs. Chiefs 1:48

Raiders QB Derek Carr discusses victory vs. Chiefs

Banned books that shaped American literature 2:08

Banned books that shaped American literature

Former Kings star DeMarcus Cousins lists Granite Bay mansion for $5,399,000 1:54

Former Kings star DeMarcus Cousins lists Granite Bay mansion for $5,399,000

See Oroville dam spillway shaping up as repairs continue and deadline looms 2:18

See Oroville dam spillway shaping up as repairs continue and deadline looms

Coming right down the chute at Oroville Dam spillway 1:40

Coming right down the chute at Oroville Dam spillway

  • See Oroville dam spillway shaping up as repairs continue and deadline looms

    Work to repair and reconstruct the main spillway at Oroville Dam has been under way since April 2017. By November 1, 2017, the main spillway at Lake Oroville is expected to be ready to handle releases of up to 100,000 cubic feet per second. When fully reconstructed, it's expected to handle 270,000 cfs, according to news reports. This video of the repair progress was posted October 17, 2017.