Capitol Alert

AM Alert: California Legislature gets back to business

State Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens, speaks at a rally where health care and immigrant rights advocates celebrated the expansion of Medi-Cal to children and teens illegally brought to the United States, held at the Capitol on May 16, 2016, in Sacramento. Lara is the chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee.
State Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens, speaks at a rally where health care and immigrant rights advocates celebrated the expansion of Medi-Cal to children and teens illegally brought to the United States, held at the Capitol on May 16, 2016, in Sacramento. Lara is the chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. AP

Today the California Legislature begins a monthlong mad dash towards the 2016 legislative deadline, navigating an August schedule packed with hot-button issues.

It begins today with marathon bill hearings in the Senate Appropriations Committee. The committee is expected to hear arguments for and against just under 300 bills. Bills that would cost more than $150,000 will then move to the suspense file for further consideration.

The Assembly Appropriations Committee, which will hold hearings Wednesday, is expected to hear presentations on more than 200 bills.

Throughout the rest of the month, lawmakers are expected to address issues including affordable housing, ridesharing regulations, overtime for farm workers, body camera regulations, and cap and trade. Lawmakers have until Aug. 31 to pass their bills before the final recess, which lasts until early January 2017.

WORTH REPEATING: “We are going to make this work.” – Howard Dean, former Vermont governor and unsuccessful 2004 presidential candidate, seeking to soothe California’s Bernie Sanders supporters at last week’s Democratic National Convention.

VIDEO OF THE DAY: One Sacramento Republican admonished Donald Trump.

SCOPING IT OUT: Assemblyman Joaquin Arambula, D-Kingsburg, and state Sen. Ed Hernandez, D-Azusa, will host a roundtable discussion with medical school officials on how to better train doctors to serve the Latino community. The discussion is the first in a three-part series that addresses the obstacles Latinos face in obtaining health care, including language barriers and fears related to immigration status. The end goal of the talks is to explore opening a medical school in the Central Valley. The discussion will begin at 3:30 p.m. in the governor’s conference room in the Capitol. Space will be limited, and registration is available here.

BALLOT BASICS: Are you with her? Do you want to make America great again? If convention season inspired you, read the Bee’s summary of important election deadlines so you don’t miss out a chance to vote for your candidate.

WHO YOU GONNA CALL? Just days after Hillary Clinton became the first female presidential nominee for a major U.S. political party, a nonprofit arm of the California Legislative Women’s Caucus is hosting a free screening of the all-female reboot of “Ghostbusters” at the Crest Theatre. Guests must RSVP. The screening begins at 6 p.m.

FOLLOW THE MONEY: The conclusion of both major parties’ conventions marks the official end of primary season, and the official beginning of a laser-sharp focus on November. To see which California ballot measures and candidates are drawing big money, check out the Bee’s Money Trail tool.

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