The Stephon Clark shooting

Sacramento police shot and killed 22-year-old Stephon Clark Sunday night, March 18, 2018. Clark was unarmed and holding only a cell phone. David Caraccio

Top stories and videos in our ongoing coverage of the Stephon Clark shooting

Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man holding a cellphone, was shot to death by Sacramento police Sunday, March 18, in the backyard of his grandparents’ home. Bodycam video of the shooting released by the police department unleashed protests in the city starting on March 23 that blocked traffic on Interstate 5 and the entrance of Golden 1 Center.

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The Bee has been Sacramento’s go-to source for transparent, in-depth coverage of the Stephon Clark shooting, protests, and civic response.

More than two dozen photographers, reporters and videographers have covered an officer-involved shooting. And the protests. But what we’re really reporting on is much deeper. There are not two sides. There are many.

And pulling together journalism that fully reflects the complexity of these moments is a challenge. We won’t always be perfect, but we’ll try like heck to come close.

We know this: we can’t do it without you. Our ask: please consider supporting your local news organization.

Our mission is to encourage engagement, to empower you with the information that can help you make a difference. We believe in our communities. And that when we’re doing it right we’re working to strengthen these places.

Now more than ever, it’s important to stay in touch.

MARCH 20

Police fired 20 times at South Sacramento man fatally shot while holding a cellphone

Stephon Clark was holding only his cellphone when he was fatally shot on the night of Sunday, March 18, by two Sacramento Police officers who fired at him 20 times, the department said Tuesday.

Sequita Thompson, recounts the harrowing night her grandson Stephon Clark was shot by Sacramento police in her backyard. Renée C. Byer


MARCH 21

‘Show me your hands.’ Police video shows death of Stephon Clark in a hail of gunfire

The Sacramento Police Department has released body cam, dash cam and helicopter footage of the Stephon Clark shooting where officers fatally shot the unarmed black man who was holding his cellphone in his grandparents' backyard.

The Sacramento Police Department has released body cam footage of the Stephon Clark shooting where officers fatally shot the unarmed black man who was holding his cellphone in his grandparents' backyard. Sacramento Police Department


MARCH 22

Another Trayvon Martin? Sacramento protesters rage over Stephon Clark’s death

The day after Sacramento Police released video of the fatal shooting of Stephon Clark, protesters disrupted Sacramento's downtown commute and the Kings game. Activists and family members of Clark demanded answers, and his family hired the lawyer who represented Trayvon Martin.

These stunning documentary images show protesters marching against the shooting of Stephon Clark by Sacramento Police made their way from city hall to Interstate 5 to the doors of Golden 1 Center Thursday.. Emily Zentner

MARCOS BRETÓN: You probably won’t be satisfied with how this Sacramento police shooting plays out

The video of an unarmed man killed by Sacramento Police may create unrealistic expectations of justice in the public. When the officers are cleared, the task for Sacramento chief Dan Hahn will be staggering.


MARCH 23

‘Shoot her 20 times in the back.’ Protest over Stephon Clark’s death turns ugly

About 200 marchers took to Sacramento's streets again a day after shutting down Interstate 5 and surrounding the Golden 1 Center, preventing most fans from attending the evening Kings game on Thursday.

Friday’s march for shooting victim Stephon Clark turned tense as protestors surrounded police and motorists. Dale Kasler

Did Stephon Clark obey officers’ orders to show his hands before he was shot?

Veteran Sacramento civil rights lawyer Mark Reichel reviewed police videos of Sunday's slaying of Stephon Clark and says he is disturbed by comments audible on tape that appear to confirm Clark was approaching police with his hands out.

Attorney Mark Reichel reviews video footage from the Stephon Clark shooting by Sacramento Police. Paul Kitagaki Jr.

ERIKA D. SMITH: Mad about Stephon Clark protesters shutting down the Kings and I-5? Check your privilege

Black Lives Matter protesters shut down the Sacramento Kings game on Thursday, March 22, after blocking Interstate 5 to protest the police shooting of Stephon Clark. Some say, protesters were wrong. Progressives should think again.

This police protester thought he was busted. He ended up chatting with Vivek Ranadive

Near the end of a dramatic and angry protest that forced Golden 1 Center arena to go on emergency lockdown for hours Thursday night, demonstration organizer Barry Accius got a surprise and slightly unnerving invitation.

Protesters jump on police cars in south Sacramento. Tense standoff ensues

A vigil for Stephon Clark turned into an ugly standoff between officers and protesters just as it was about to end late Friday night.

Protesters jump on police car in South Sacramento when a tense standoff ensues after a candlelight vigil for Stephon Clark on Friday. Hector Amezcua


MARCH 25

Protesters rage at police, but not at their boss. Can he satisfy the community and the cops?

Sacramento’s first African American police chief has maintained community trust and political backing even as protests raged following the police shooting of Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man.


MARCH 26

Black leaders demand criminal charges against police officers who shot Stephon Clark

Clark’s family and leaders of Sacramento’s black community demanded that the police officers who shot him be held accountable for his death. They were joined by Benjamin Crump, lawyer for family of Trayvon Martin at a Monday press conference.


MARCH 27

California AG to oversee investigation into fatal police shooting of Stephon Clark

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said Tuesday his office would provide independent oversight of the investigation into the death of Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man who was shot and killed by two Sacramento police officers earlier this month in his grandparents' backyard.

MARCOS BRETÓN: Protesters called him ‘Uncle Tom.’ He took the abuse because that’s how the CHP – and his dad – trained him

CHP Sgt. Ron Wade was the lone African American among the officers blocking protesters of the fatal police shooting of Stephon Clark as they attempted to shut down Interstate 5 on Friday in Sacramento. He became a focal point of their anger. He says it hurt, but compassion is the only way to resolve disputes.

Protesters block Golden 1 Center, again, after disrupting council meeting on shooting of Stephon Clark

The police shooting of Stephon Clark was intended to be addressed at a Sacramento City Council meeting that quickly devolved into chaos Tuesday. Protesters also blocked entrance to a Kings game at Golden 1 Center again.

The brother of Stephon Clark, the unarmed black man shot by Sacramento police on March 18, 2018, disrupts Sacramento City Council meeting. Stevante Clark told the Mayor Steinberg to shut up. Jose Luis Villegas


MARCH 28

Police work on plan to get fans safely into Thursday’s Kings game. Will they show up?

Sacramento police said Wednesday they are working on a plan to ensure fans will get into Golden 1 Center for Thursday’s Sacramento Kings game vs. the Indiana Pacers. Protesters have prevented thousands from entering two of the last three games.

When Stephon Clark protesters shout ‘F--- the police’ in their faces, what’s a cop to do?

Protests in Sacramento over the shooting death of unarmed resident Stephon Clark have closed a freeway, shut down access to Sacramento Kings games and left marchers screaming face to face at police. Law enforcement officials say police are working hard not to escalate the situation.

ERIKA D. SMITH: Want justice for Stephon Clark? Anger alone isn’t the way to do it

Protesters flooded Sacramento City Hall in California on Tuesday to vent about the police shooting of Stephon Clark, killed by two officers in his grandmother’s backyard. Reform must come from the California Legislature and Congress.


MARCH 29

Brother throws himself on Stephon Clark’s casket: ‘We’re gonna forgive the mayor.’

Stephon Clark’s brother threw himself on his casket as the Rev. Al Sharpton asked Sacramento funeral mourners to “stop this madness” of police killings.

Friends, family and community leaders gather March 29, 2018, in south Sacramento to commemorate Stephon Clark, the 22-year-old Sacramento man whose shooting death by police 11 days ago has sparked drama and protests. AP

Kings announce partnership with activist groups after Stephon Clark protests shut down arena

The Sacramento Kings will set up an education fund for the children of Stephon Clark and begin working with local groups leading protests around Golden 1 Center, with Vince Carter, Garrett Temple and Doug Christie all involved.


MARCH 30

Stephon Clark shot six times in back - eight times in all - private autopsy says

Stephon Clark private autopsy results were released by family attorney Benjamin Crump on Friday.

Private pathologist Dr. Bennet Omalu, the former chief medical examiner in San Joaquin County best known for his research on football-related concussions, describes what he found in his autopsy of Stephon Clark, who was killed by Sacramento police. Hector Amezcua


MARCH 31

Should cops always chase suspects? Sacramento considers reform after Stephon Clark shooting

Mayor Darrell Steinberg wants to scrutinize Sacramento police use-of-force practices after the Stephon Clark shooting. Some departments tell police to de-escalate conflicts.

MARCOS BRETÓN: Here’s another result of the Stephon Clark autopsy – cops can’t investigate cops

The private autopsy of Stephon Clark paid for by defense attorney Benjamin Crump and conducted by former San Joaquin medical examiner Bennet Omalu revealed Friday that Clark had been shot eight times March 18, six times in the back. The results raise questions about police conduct and law enforcement organizations’ ability to investigate themselves.

With Stevante Clark’s pain laid bare to the world, a family friend pleads for help

Stevante Clark’s pain is naked for Sacramento, and suddenly, the world to see. The brother of 22-year-old Stephon Clark has seemingly been everywhere since his brother's death March 18 at the hands of police.


APRIL 2

Stephon Clark family legal team explains autopsy drawing error with wrong bullet entry

The lawyer for the family of Stephon Clark Monday clarified where he was shot after two sets of conflicting autopsy drawings were released last week.

According to the private autopsy performed by Dr. Bennet Omalu, Stephon Clark was hit by eight bullets – and six times in the back – when police fired on him in the backyard of his grandparents’ home in Sacramento. Sohail Al-Jamea


APRIL 3

‘It just doesn't look right,’ says Sacramento councilman who represents Stephon Clark neighborhood

Tuesday’s Sacramento City Council meeting began with relative order one week after Stevante Clark forced an early end to the session when he leaped onto the council dais and rebuked the mayor over his brother Stephon Clark’s fatal police shooting.


APRIL 5

Sacramento’s black police chief talks race and policing

Sacramento Police Chief Daniel Hahn is interviewed on McClatchy’s Minorty Minority podcast. He talks about the events surrounding Stephon Clark’s shooting, his experience as the city’s first African-American police chief, implicit bias in police departments around the country, and the challenges his community faces now.


APRIL 8

He has become a hashtag and a movement for change. But who was the real Stephon Clark?

Who exactly was the handsome, 22-year-old father of two whose easy smile projects from posters and TV screens and the front pages of newspapers? Clark’s life, like his death, was complicated, according to public records and interviews with those who knew him.

MARCOS BRETÓN: ‘Implicit bias’ replaces the ‘R’ word. This is how we explain cops killing black men.

“Implicit bias” is the term used recently by Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg and U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris in describing the underlying possible causes for the March 18 shooting of Stephon Clark, and it is a preferred, softer term than “racism” to avoid alienating law enforcement as it addresses how officers assume black men to be dangerous.


APRIL 9

‘I needed to be away from the fake love.’ Stephon Clark’s brother seeks mental health help

Stevante Clark, the older brother of Stephon Clark, was admitted to a Sacramento mental health in-patient treatment center for two days last week. Stephon was shot by police on March 18, igniting weeks of protests.

Dave Reiling, the neighbor who called 911 before Stephon Clark was fatally shot by Sacramento Police, says he's now hesitant to call the police. Nashelly Chavez

‘It makes me never want to call 911 again,’ neighbor says after Stephon Clark shooting

The neighbor who called 911 March 18 to report broken car windows prior to the fatal shooting of Stephon Clark says he is afraid to call police in the aftermath of the shooting.


APRIL 10

Cops muted their body cams after Stephon Clark shooting. Now they need to keep mikes on

The Sacramento Police Department has issued an emergency memo ordering officers to keep their body cameras and microphones on unless they get the approval of a supervisor. The officers who shot and killed Stephon Clark had turned their microphones off minutes after the shooting.

Police chief vows to change policies to avoid another Stephon Clark-like shooting

Sacramento Police Chief Daniel Hahn told the City Council on Tuesday that “our community is crying out for change” following the shooting death of an unarmed black man in Meadowview last month at the hands of two of his officers.

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

The Bee has been Sacramento’s go-to source for transparent, in-depth coverage of the Stephon Clark shooting, protests, and civic response.

More than two dozen photographers, reporters and videographers have covered an officer-involved shooting. And the protests. But what we’re really reporting on is much deeper. There are not two sides. There are many.

And pulling together journalism that fully reflects the complexity of these moments is a challenge. We won’t always be perfect, but we’ll try like heck to come close.

We know this: we can’t do it without you. Our ask: please consider supporting your local news organization.

Our mission is to encourage engagement, to empower you with the information that can help you make a difference. We believe in our communities. And that when we’re doing it right we’re working to strengthen these places.

Now more than ever, it’s important to stay in touch.